• Social Studies Blog. How to succeed in social business.
  • The Many Hats of A Community Manager: Celebrating #CMAD

    In light of Community Manager Appreciation Day this coming Monday, January 28th, we’ve put together an Infographic to highlight the many hats a community manager wears. We’d like to give them a huge virtual round of applause to honor the business value they bring to their organizations.

    The infographic below illustrates the many skills a community manager must possess to execute their job effectively. We want to acknowledge the significant impact each community manager has on their company’s bottom line, including reducing support costs and increasing customer acquisition.

    The Many Hats of the Community Manager

    Oh so many hats!
    In our infographic we highlight the many hats a community manager must wear in his/her everyday life. Below are three that we deem to be very valuable!

    Detective – During an average work day the first thing a community manager does is check in on the community to see if customers are having any challenges. They can see how many support questions have been answered by the community, and if a question was not solved by other members of the community or information that is already posted on the community forum, the community manager is the first one alerted. They then execute detective work to get to the bottom of the customer issue, and if necessary, escalate to the customer support team.

    Therapist - When an irate customer airs grievances in the community, it’s the community manager’s job to ensure the customer is heard.  The community manager must be an empathetic person. He/She is responsible for diffusing customer frustrations and acknowledging the customer and their concerns on behalf of the company. It is also the community manager’s job to route that customer to the right place–or walk them through the solution in a calm way. A community manager has a virtual couch for any customer who needs to put their feet up and air grievances–that sounds like a therapist if you ask us!

    Analyst – The community manager must have a keen eye for analytics. Analytical tools are necessary to report data back to the organization–and the community manager is trusted to do this in an easy-to-understand and simple way. The metrics showing the health of the community are an integral part of improving the community. The community manager wears the hat of “analyst” by always doing what’s in the best interest of the organization. In considering that customer data, he/she must make recommendations back to the team based on what is in the best interest of not only the organization, but the customer as well.

    The Get Satisfaction #CMAD infographic shows how valuable community managers are to their organizations. Across the world on #CMAD we recognize the incredible value they bring.  Thanks to their hard work, community managers help their organizations:

    • Reduce support costs
    • Increase customer acquisition
    • Drive product innovation

    For those of you who don’t have a community manager—you’re missing out. For those of you who don’t know where he/she sits within the organization, Monday would be a good day to find them and say thank you. These folks are championing your products and services—join us in thanking community managers on this Community Manager Appreciation Day!

     

    Subscribe to the Social Studies blog for the tools to unleash the power of customer conversations.


    Previous post link
    Next post link
    Hanna Johnson

    About Hanna Johnson

    Hanna is the Marketing Manager for Get Satisfaction. She spends her days connecting, educating, and inspiring curiosity in customers online and off. When she's not in the Satisfactory, she's likely on the move, seeking out new sights, flavors, and sounds. She blogs at TheRoadsToRoam.com.

    1 Comments

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published.

    You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

    Scroll To Top