• Community Manager Tip of the Week: Encouraging Company-Wide Participation

    Community participation

    At Get Satisfaction, we reward community participation with coffee!

    Community Managers are one of the most consistent liaisons between a company and its customers. CMs are in charge of keeping customers engaged and happy, relaying their ideas and feedback to the Product Team, and working with engineers to troubleshoot issues. But keeping a community happy, healthy, and efficient takes a village…or at least input from employees with different areas of knowledge and expertise!

    Sometimes Community Managers need to wait for official responses from different teams or learn more technical aspects of a particular product. Getting your company involved with your community will help you avoid burnout, provide the fast, helpful service your customers expect, and build internal collaboration. Here are a few tips for Community Managers to get other departments in your company involved with community:

     

    1. Provide other departments with community access and training

    Often times, many employees outside of the community team want to help but are hesitant to participate because they’re afraid of stepping on someone’s toes or writing a reply that doesn’t align with the community’s voice or messaging. If you spend a little time with each department and provide a quick overview or training about your community and some best practices on how to use it, you’ll find that your colleagues will feel more confident about lending a hand. Make it fun by turning it into a pizza and beer teach-in party!

     

    2. Give praise and incentives for participation

    Make sure you are encouraging other team members to join the conversation. Let them know that you want them to participate, and give them some praise when they’ve done a good job. You could send a company-wide email that acknowledges their support or even give out small incentives when they help out. Here at The Satisfactory, we like to reward a different employee every week with a coffee drink of their choice for helping out in our community.

    3. Use an internal community for collaboration

    Community Managers can’t wear all the hats or always know every little detail about what’s happening throughout the company. An internal community will benefit every employee when it comes to having a strong internal knowledge base and place to share information or ask questions. Create an internal community where your Product Team can share updates, non-technical team members can ask developers questions, and team members can give praise to others for a job well done. This will also allow non-Community Managers to see the questions that are coming into the community so they can help you respond efficiently and effectively.

    These steps will allow your colleagues to see the extent and importance of your day-to-day efforts, as well as lend a hand when you’re knee deep in tasks and requests. You (and the rest of your company!) will be grateful to have established a positive internal environment that supports your community with such great strengths, so start building those internal relationships now!

     

    Subscribe to the Social Studies blog for the tools to unleash the power of customer conversations.


    Previous post link
    Next post link
    Stephanie Au

    About Stephanie Au

    Community Support Manager at Get Satisfaction. Specialties:Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe InDesign, Adobe Dreamweaver, Adobe After Effects, Microsoft Office Suite, HTML, CSS, Endnote, Zoomerang Survey Generator, IRB Certified.

    1 Comments

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published.

    You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

    Scroll To Top